By Passing Far Cry 4’s Unskippable Start Animation

This appears like the type of thing we have to be writing for each game of late. In which the vanity of marketers sees them neglect to permit the gamer to simply skip previous their starting vanity displays, and you anxiously click on and cut at each key, positive that they certainly can’t be this vain? Thankfully, the wonderful enjoyment of Far Cry 4 may be easily more rapidly attained, without needing to seek out the individual obscurely-named video files from the absolute depths of your hard disk.

I believe it’s reasonable for this kind of clips to experience out the first time a video game is released. Tedious, however good. However after that, obviously you have to be in a position to click past them. Far Cry 4’s introduction stings aren’t the most severe I’ve noticed this year, however when individuals are experiencing bugs and also have to reboot, they can turn out to be specifically egregious. And it doesn’t help that after becoming glacially advised of the writer, the engine, and an images card producer, you’re then shown a completely unnecessary animation saying the name of the sport. Um, yes, I’m the person who launched it. After which, it delays issues even more to let you know – each time – not to explode the local power grid whenever a circulating animation is playing. It’s as if video game marketers checked out the horror of obligatory DVD intro displays and thought, “We will go larger.”

If you purchased the video game via Steam, it’s as simple as a pre-bought pie. Discover the video game in your library, right check out it, and hit Properties. In the box that appears is a choice for “SET LAUNCH OPTIONS”. Click that, and the field that seems, place in “-skipintro” (without quotes, with no space). Right now, when you start the video game either from Steam, or from the not-actually-a-proper-shortcut it place on your desktop, the video game will jump right to its alternatives screen.

If you set up the video game from a disc (caveman), then you’ll use a more appropriate desktop or Start menu shortcut. Right go through the icon or Start entry, and pick “Properties”. Here you need to view a box referred to as “Target:”, and in there a spiel that informs it where to locate the video game. On the end of it all, paste in ” -skipintro” (once again, without those estimates, and the space is essential), and click “OK”. It should appear like this, but naturally the opening place stuff depends in which you installed it.

“C:\Program Files (x86)\Ubisoft\Ubisoft Game Launcher\games\Far Cry 4\bin\FarCry4.exe” –skipintro. If it doesn’t work still, try “-skip intro 1?. Now 2x click the icon/hit the Start entry, and you need to be swooshy-animation free. And when you launch via Uplay, first have a very good long look in the mirror, and then discover where the video game is a component of your machine, view in the /bin folder for the .exe that roll-outs the video game, and right check out it and tell it to create a desktop shortcut. Then refer to the instructions over and start it via that in the future.

Regrettably we’ve yet to discover a way to by pass the in-game cutscenes, which FC4 so amazingly doesn’t let you leap. This is particularly entertaining when a random quest fail reboots you back in entrance of a meandering discussion by which you need to twiddle your digits again and again. Ubisoft, make sure you, patch this in, you monsters.

Day of Farmers Mod now on Hay Day

Hay Day Update

More than two years after the release of Hay Day its Mod community is still red hot, and still cranking out great mods. The latest to completely dominate the hearts and minds of players is Day of Farmers. The hook is simple — farming style competition. Who doesn’t want to play?

Sure, a few people may point to Pol Pot, but if you want titanic gaming experience, nothing is better than this. And yes, we realize a few of you out there with twisted minds and a penchant for doing things online that you can’t do in real life will line right up to play. Regardless of the morality, Day of Farmers convincingly brings to life a farmer none of us remember except through TV, movies or possibly books. Of course this isn’t anything close to what real world went through, but for us latter-day gamer geeks, this is about as close as we can get without going postal someplace.

Day of Farmers for Hay Day is something like an onion with layers of complexity. The first layer when you’re a newbie will consist of figuring out the maps and classes. As time progresses the next layer will peel itself back — gaining diamonds for the team, gaining real points and matching classes to the farms.

There is definitely a learning curve, but we can help. Besides detailing Hay Day our likes and dislikes, we’ve put together a little Day of Farmer primer: a guide to the popular farms. If you’re ready to give Day of farmers a try, you’ll need to go no further.

What exactly will you be getting into with Day of Farmers for Hay Day playres? It’s the  various maps that try to recreate many famous farming simulation scenarios.

The most excellent aspect of Day of Farmers update for Hay Day is undoubtedly the mapping. Complex and simple at the same time, some of the maps represent the same skill in mapping we saw in other popular titles. The entire map can be covered through back alleys just wide enough for one man. And rooftop perches are strewn throughout in strategic positions.

That’s not to say the update doesn’t have problems. It does. It’s a beta, what do you expect? The scoring system immediately pops to mind as a problem that most gamers are going to hate. Besides those problems and a few glitchy beta problems we’ve seen, we’re in love. If you play multiplayer Hay Day at all, give this mod a chance.

Top Technology of 2001, Now a Big Edge

Contrary to its horribly misleading name, “Bluetooth” isn’t a discoloring dental disease, it’s actually an industry buzz word for a communication technology promising to make our high-tech lives less, um, well, “wired.” Bluetooth is poised to replace common cables currently used between computers and computer peripherals, PDAs, phones, pagers, modems and digital cameras — with a reliable, affordable and relatively high-speed wireless solution between devices.

This Ericsson T28 has a Bluetooth wireless headset for cord-free yapping.
This short-range radio, chip-based technology is tiny and cheap, and was initially designed by cell phone giant Ericsson, but was then quickly adopted by dozens of other high-tech companies — including such heavyweights as Intel and IBM — and now there’s a universal standard that manufacturers are adhering to in order to ensure capability between devices. Over 40 upcoming Bluetooth-enabled products were shown at Comdex 2000 in Las Vegas, and you can expect an even greater number on display at the upcoming Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January, 2001.

No more trailing ethernet cords when you’ve got a wireless LAN hub.
So the computers of the future will likely still have keyboards, mice, scanners and printers, but long gone will be those dangling cords linking up each device to the PC. And do you remember how you had to connect your Palm or PocketPC to your computer to sync up software or install new programs? Or first connect your digital camera to your PC in order to print out an 8×10? Not anymore. We’re talking about a completely wireless, convergent future.

And with the sheer number of companies jumping on the Bluetooth bandwagon, ideas on how to use the technology are proliferating. A few novel (and practical) applications include employees who can roam around the office and print off a document right from their PDAs; refrigerators that can communicate to a PC to say the food supply is down or the temperature is too high; digital video recorders that can be set to record The X-Files with a few taps on a cell phone from your car; or inexpensive Bluetooth chips placed in freight containers to identify their contents as a truck pulls into a warehouse.

Write directly to your PDA, PC or fax.
An early and promising use for Bluetooth was recently displayed by newcomer Anoto, which has developed a Bluetooth-equipped pen that allows users to send data from paper directly to devices such as PCs and fax machines. Already the company has “inked” deals with international stationary outfits 3M, Filofax, Mead and Franklin Covey. Expect many more inexpensive Bluetooth devices to surface in the spring and summer of 2001.

Oh, and if you’re wondering where the term “Bluetooth” came from, it’s named after a 10th century Danish Viking, Harald Blatand (“Bluetooth” in English), who had a yen for blueberries so strong his teeth were permanently stained. Harald’s name was chosen because, allegedly, he helped unite Denmark with Norway.